Prevalent Hummingbirds in Summer Sedona

Anna’s

Anna’s Hummingbirds reside year-round in Sedona and nest here as early as January – even when it is snowing! They have a bright red crown and gorget and a distinctive chatter. Their range extends from southern Alaska to northern Mexico.

Black–chinned

The Black-chinned Hummingbird bobs its tail as it hovers at feeders or flowers. Males are smaller than females and have a purple strip below their black chin. They are the most widespread hummer in the western U.S.

Rufous

The feisty Rufous Hummingbird breeds as far north as Alaska, then migrates 4000 miles to southern Mexico, traveling farther than any other hummingbird.  With their rufous body and bright copper-colored gorget, they are a delight to see during their short stay as they fuel up during their southern migration.

Uncommon Hummingbirds in Summer Sedona

Broad-tailed

In flight, the Broad-tailed Hummingbird makes a high-pitched humming sound via the vibration of its two outermost wing feathers. It derives its name from its comparatively large tail. Generally found in higher elevations in the U.S., they have the longest lifespan on record: 12 years!

Calliope

Another hummer that is generally found at higher elevations, the Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest bird in North America, weighing about the same as a penny (2.5 grams). When perched, their wings stretch out longer than their short tail. Adult males have a streaked magenta gorget.

Rare Hummingbirds in Summer Sedona

Costa’s

The Costa’s Hummingbird has a striking purple crown and gorget that extends into long points on either side of its body. Preferring desert habitat, they are permanent residents in parts of Southern Arizona – but some do enjoy spending a bit of time in Sedona during the hot summer months!

Broad-billed

The only red-billed hummingbird found in Sedona, the Broad-billed Hummingbird’s blue and green feathers seem to shimmer over its entire body. More common in Southeastern Arizona, individuals do appear in the Sedona area, usually near rivers and streams.

Rivoli’s

We chose the Rivoli’s to be our inaugural Festival Bird because this large hummingbird is simply stunning, and we are very fortunate to have a few in nearby Oak Creek Canyon. Males have a black breast, bluish green back, violet crown, and a gorget that seems to shift from teal to bright green. Because these birds prefer mountainous pine-oak forests and shady canyons, their brilliant colors are sometimes difficult to see. Read more about the magnificent Rivoli’s Hummingbird here ⇒

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Prevalent Hummingbirds in Summer Sedona

Anna’s

Anna’s Hummingbirds reside year-round in Sedona and nest here as early as January – even when it is snowing! They have a bright red crown and gorget and a distinctive chatter. Their range extends from southern Alaska to northern Mexico.

Black–chinned

The Black-chinned Hummingbird bobs its tail as it hovers at feeders or flowers. Males are smaller than females and have a purple strip below their black chin. They are the most widespread hummer in the western U.S.

Rufous

The feisty Rufous Hummingbird breeds as far north as Alaska, then migrates 4000 miles to southern Mexico, traveling farther than any other hummingbird.  With their rufous body and bright copper-colored gorget, they are a delight to see during their short stay as they fuel up during their southern migration.

Uncommon Hummingbirds in Summer Sedona

Broad-tailed

In flight, the Broad-tailed Hummingbird makes a high-pitched humming sound via the vibration of its two outermost wing feathers. It derives its name from its comparatively large tail. Generally found in higher elevations in the U.S., they have the longest lifespan on record: 12 years!

Calliope

Another hummer that is generally found at higher elevations, the Calliope Hummingbird is the smallest bird in North America, weighing about the same as a penny (2.5 grams). When perched, their wings stretch out longer than their short tail. Adult males have a streaked magenta gorget.

Rare Hummingbirds in Summer Sedona

Costa’s

The Costa’s Hummingbird has a striking purple crown and gorget that extends into long points on either side of its body. Preferring desert habitat, they are permanent residents in parts of Southern Arizona – but some do enjoy spending a bit of time in Sedona during the hot summer months!

Broad-billed

The only red-billed hummingbird found in Sedona, the Broad-billed Hummingbird’s blue and green feathers seem to shimmer over its entire body. More common in Southeastern Arizona, individuals do appear in the Sedona area, usually near rivers and streams.

Rivoli’s

We chose the Rivoli’s to be our inaugural Festival Bird because this large hummingbird is simply stunning, and we are very fortunate to have a few in nearby Oak Creek Canyon. Males have a black breast, bluish green back, violet crown, and a gorget that seems to shift from teal to bright green. Because these birds prefer mountainous pine-oak forests and shady canyons, their brilliant colors are sometimes difficult to see. Read more about the magnificent Rivoli’s Hummingbird here ⇒

Sponsors

Accelerated Web Systems
Share Post